eurybislineata
haiii, I'm Valentene.
24 years old, from Pennsylvania.

astronomy, biology, cats, cats, vegan/vegetarianism, herpetology, hiking, philosophy, cats, art (mostly photography), video gaming, reading, sci-fi, tattoos... and cats.
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also,

took the telescope outside last night…

holywhoa stars. it was so clear out, and in any one position I set the ‘scope, it sought out at least 15 stars (at 20x magnification)! I couldn’t find the pleiades star cluster, though (on the scope, I could easily see it in the sky).

shall try again tonight!

miscreantt:

Dopppe

the desire to be able to do this.

(Source: )

miscreantt:

Dopppe

the desire to be able to do this.
fer1972:

Summer Night by Akageno Saru

"A solar outburst sparked surprising displays of the northern lights as far south as Arkansas, Mississippi and North Carolina tonight, marking one of the farthest-reaching auroral shows in years

… 

The cause of the show was a coronal mass ejection from the sun that hit Earth’s magnetosphere at about 2 p.m. ET, SpaceWeather.com reported.

The impact caused a strong compression in the magnetic field, allowing electrically charged particles from the solar wind to penetrate down to geosynchronous orbit (22,000 miles or 35,000 kilometers in altitude). That means Earth-orbiting satellites could have been exposed to the solar storm, analysts said.

All these pictures may be pretty, but stronger solar storms can have a significant downside: They could disrupt satellite communication as well as power grids. There were no immediate indications that tonight’s bout of space weather caused significant problems.”

"A solar outburst sparked surprising displays of the northern lights as far south as Arkansas, Mississippi and North Carolina tonight, marking one of the farthest-reaching auroral shows in years
 … 
The cause of the show was a coronal mass ejection from the sun that hit Earth’s magnetosphere at about 2 p.m. ET, SpaceWeather.com reported.
The impact caused a strong compression in the magnetic field, allowing electrically charged particles from the solar wind to penetrate down to geosynchronous orbit (22,000 miles or 35,000 kilometers in altitude). That means Earth-orbiting satellites could have been exposed to the solar storm, analysts said.
…
All these pictures may be pretty, but stronger solar storms can have a significant downside: They could disrupt satellite communication as well as power grids. There were no immediate indications that tonight’s bout of space weather caused significant problems.”
Light pollution at it’s finest.